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Two Orangutans released into Bukit Tigapuluh Rainforest

On 23 December 2015 two orangutans were successfully reintroduced to Bukit Tigapuluh National Park, adding to the population of critically endangered Sumatran orangutans living in the wild.

Ragal is moved in a transport box to the forest.
Regal is moved in a transport box to the forest.

6 January, Jambi Indonesia On 23 December 2015 two orangutans were successfully reintroduced to Bukit Tigapuluh National Park, adding to the population of critically endangered Sumatran orangutans living in the wild. Accompanied by our staff and veterinarians Suzie (10 years old, female) and Ragal (11 years old, male) were moved from the Open Orangutan Sanctuary Danau Alo to Sungai Pengian Reintroduction Centre.

 

Suzie and Ragal were released near a fruit tree a few kilometres off the station. The following night was the first one they spent by themselves in the forest. Fortunately, both of them built a nest and slept up in the trees, away from the danger of tigers.

 

Here at Sungai Pengian, the two orangutans will continue their adaptation process. They will be shown new forest fruits that they have never tried before as some trees have started to bear fruits in Pengian release site. What is more, FZS staff will also bring Suzie and Ragal together with more experienced orangutans which will give them more opportunities to learn.

 

To make sure they adapt well to their natural environment, our staff will closely monitor them for at least three months – following them through the jungle. Only when we are sure Suzie and Ragal have fully adjusted to a life in freedom, the monitoring will be gradually decreased and we will check on them only occasionally, using radio telemetry.

About the project

The Bukit Tigapuluh landscape is a biodiversity hotspot and our goal is to preserve its beauty, its wildlife and its importance as a functional ecosystem for future generations. The Bukit Tigapuluh Landscape Conservation Programme was started in 2001 by German biologist Dr Peter Pratje. It has grown from an orangutan reintroduction project into a large scale conservation programme that includes Sumatran elephant conservation, community development, education and forest protection. 

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