The Serengeti ecosystem is a world-renowned natural landscape and listed UNESCO World Heritage Site. The Great Migration involving wildebeest, zebra, and Thomson’s gazelles that takes place here is the largest ungulate migration on earth. With resilient populations of predators and iconic wildlife such as elephants, giraffes, and rhinos, the Serengeti is a majestic natural landscape.

“Serengeti shall not die” is the title of Bernhard and Michael Grzimek’s academy award-winning 1959 documentary and represents Frankfurt Zoological Society’s (FZS) goal and vision to this day; the Serengeti remains at the core of our conservation work in Africa.

Quick Facts
  • Project: Serengeti Conservation Project
  • Serengeti National Park Area Size: 14,750 km²
  • Project start: 1957
  • Program Manager: Rian Labuschagne
A Husky plane, donated by the German government, is used in anti-poaching patrolling and surveying the Serengeti. It is very lightweight and can easily be pushed on the ground by one or two people. Here an FZS staff member is making sure that it is in good condition for flying. Seronera, Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. © Daniel Rosengren
A Community Conservation Bank (COCOBA) meeting in a village north of Mahale National Park. @ Daniel Rosengren
FZS Project leader for Serengeti Ecosystem Management talking with local people on the highlands of Loliondo, Tanzania. © Daniel Rosengren
A Moru ranger, sitting in an observation tower and keeping track of the rhinos as well as looking out for poachers. Moru, Serengeti, Tanzania. © Daniel Rosengren
FZS Serengeti Programme Manager flying a plane over Seronera, Serengeti, Tanzania. © Daniel Rosengren
Mechanics at work at the FZS workshop. Seronera, Serengeti, Tanzania. © Daniel Rosengren
A group photo of the COCOBA members after a COCOBA meeting. FZS Community Conservation Officer is seen to the left of the box. Mugumu area, west of Serengeti, Tanzania. © Daniel Rosengren
A Moru rhino Ranger, scanning and searching for rhinos. Radio transmitters have been put in the rhino's horns that can be tracked with telemetry equipment. Moru, Serengeti, Tanzania. © Daniel Rosengren
A Husky plane, donated by the German government, that is used in anti-poaching patrolling and surveying the Serengeti. It is very lightweight and can fly at low altitudes. Seronera, Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. © Daniel Rosengren
The de-snaring team taking down and dismantling poacher’s snares. Grumeti Game Reserve, Tanzania. © Daniel Rosengren
Zebras passing by the former FZS staff houses in Fort Ikoma, Tanzania. © Daniel Rosengren
The FZS workshop team in a group photo. Seronera, Serengeti, Tanzania. © Daniel Rosengren

How we support the Serengeti

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News from Tanzania

  • 06/11/2021Project update

    The radio influencer

    06/11/2021Project update

    The radio influencer

    From FZS intern to locally famous ‘radio girl’. Christina Gregory empowers women to participate in economic activities by sharing programs about FZS supported Community Conservation Banks. Her radio programs are making a difference to people, especially women, in her region.

  • 11/23/2020Blog

    The pandemic is affecting Serengeti’s protection. But not all is lost.

    11/23/2020Blog

    The pandemic is affecting Serengeti’s protection. But not all is lost.

    Lack of income means national park authorities struggle to keep wildlife safe. But you can help change that.

  • 09/22/2020Blog

    Saving the Serengeti Rhino

    09/22/2020Blog

    Saving the Serengeti Rhino

    Weighing up to 1,400 kg and measuring up to 3.75 meters from the head to base of the tail, black rhinos are among the world’s largest land animals. Despite their strength, they don’t stand a chance against poachers, who hunt them for their horns and nearly caused their demise in … Read more

Project Partners

Successful conservation is always the result of great teamwork. We collaborate with local communities, national authorities, and conservation organizations. Our partners make our conservation work possible.

  • https://www.maliasili.go.tz/sectors/category/wildlifeWildlife Division of the Ministry of Natural Resources and Tourism of Tanzania
  • Tanzania National Parks (TANAPA)
  • Ngorongoro Conservation Area Authority (NCAA)
  • Tanzania Wildlife Authority (TAWA)
  • Tanzania Wildlife Research Institute (TAWIRI)
  • Pasiansi Wildlife Training Institute
  • Mweka Wildlife College
  • The Wyss Foundation
  • Lion Recovery Fund
  • U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
  • Rhino Recovery Fund
  • JRS Biodiversity Fund
  • KfW Group
  • Tanzania Association of Tour Operators (TATO)
  • SENAPA Investors
  • Eleonore Beck Foundation
  • Friedkin Conservation Fund
  • Asilia Giving
  • Stadler Family Foundation
  • Manfred-Hermsen Stiftung
  • The Wildcat Foundation
  • Save the Elephants
  • Elephant Crisis Fund
  • Stop Ivory
  • Tusk Trust
  • Save the Rhino
  • Dvůr Králové Safari Park
  • World Nomads
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Contact

Zoologische Gesellschaft Frankfurt von 1858 e.V.
Bernhard-Grzimek-Allee 1
60316 Frankfurt

Telephone: +49 (0)69 - 94 34 46 0
Fax: +49 (0)69 - 43 93 48
E-Mail

You will find our office in the Zoogesellschaftshaus (4th floor).
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